The Herodium palace, with King Herod’s tomb site and private theatre he built between 23-15BC in the Judaean desert, southeast of Bethlehem in the occupied West Bank. Photo: AFP
The Herodium palace, with King Herod’s tomb site and private theatre he built between 23-15BC in the Judaean desert, southeast of Bethlehem in the occupied West Bank. Photo: AFP
History

Parts of King Herod’s spectacular hilltop palace, where Roman-era tyrant of Judea was buried, opening to the public for first time

  • On Sunday, the public will be allowed to see for the first time Herodium’s legendary arched stairway, foyer and private theatre
  • Archaeologists say ruler decided to bury his palace so his final resting place would never be overshadowed, helping preserve the site for 2,000 years

The Herodium palace, with King Herod’s tomb site and private theatre he built between 23-15BC in the Judaean desert, southeast of Bethlehem in the occupied West Bank. Photo: AFP
The Herodium palace, with King Herod’s tomb site and private theatre he built between 23-15BC in the Judaean desert, southeast of Bethlehem in the occupied West Bank. Photo: AFP
READ FULL ARTICLE