A guide takes tourists through a mangrove forest in Kilim Karst Geoforest Park in Langkawi,  Malaysia. Photo: Leisa Tyler/LightRocket via Getty Images A guide takes tourists through a mangrove forest in Kilim Karst Geoforest Park in Langkawi,  Malaysia. Photo: Leisa Tyler/LightRocket via Getty Images
A guide takes tourists through a mangrove forest in Kilim Karst Geoforest Park in Langkawi, Malaysia. Photo: Leisa Tyler/LightRocket via Getty Images

Malaysian resort island Langkawi can avoid environmental disaster by making the most of flying lemur and other wildlife’s comeback during Covid-19 travel ban, scientist says

  • Langkawi faces ecological ruin from badly managed tourism, although the travel ban has helped wildlife, including colugos - flying lemurs - make a comeback
  • A primatologist studying the colugo, an ‘evolutionary missing link’, believes more eco-tourism could be the answer, with Sabah in Malaysian Borneo an example

Topic |   Responsible travel
A guide takes tourists through a mangrove forest in Kilim Karst Geoforest Park in Langkawi,  Malaysia. Photo: Leisa Tyler/LightRocket via Getty Images A guide takes tourists through a mangrove forest in Kilim Karst Geoforest Park in Langkawi,  Malaysia. Photo: Leisa Tyler/LightRocket via Getty Images
A guide takes tourists through a mangrove forest in Kilim Karst Geoforest Park in Langkawi, Malaysia. Photo: Leisa Tyler/LightRocket via Getty Images
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