A dyeing works in Hong Kong new town Tsuen Wan in the 1970s. Such factories were responsible for air and water pollution. Picture: SCMP
Jason Wordie
Opinion

Opinion

Then & Now by Jason Wordie

When Hong Kong textile mills were free to pollute Victoria Harbour and streams ran red, green, and yellow with run-off

Textile mills provided employment for several generations of Hongkongers and made their proprietors rich, but the coloured effluent that spewed from dyeing works defiled city nullahs and inshore waters until production moved to China

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A dyeing works in Hong Kong new town Tsuen Wan in the 1970s. Such factories were responsible for air and water pollution. Picture: SCMP
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