A Hong Kong hawker sells sweet potatoes, a popular snack in the city during winter. Photo: Shutterstock A Hong Kong hawker sells sweet potatoes, a popular snack in the city during winter. Photo: Shutterstock
A Hong Kong hawker sells sweet potatoes, a popular snack in the city during winter. Photo: Shutterstock
Jason Wordie
Opinion

Opinion

Then & Now by Jason Wordie

How Hong Kong got its taste for sweet potatoes, once grown as pig feed

  • The sweet potato was a hardy, hearty – and delicious – substitute for rice and was widely used to feed pigs, making it less attractive for some people
  • The Manchus may have ended their rule a century earlier had it not been for ‘New World’ foods helping to calm rural unrest over food shortages and overpopulation

A Hong Kong hawker sells sweet potatoes, a popular snack in the city during winter. Photo: Shutterstock A Hong Kong hawker sells sweet potatoes, a popular snack in the city during winter. Photo: Shutterstock
A Hong Kong hawker sells sweet potatoes, a popular snack in the city during winter. Photo: Shutterstock
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