Edwin Landseer’s The Monarch of the Glen (1851) and other nostalgic paintings in reproduction form evoked idealised versions of Britain in homesick settlers from Hong Kong to Tasmania. Credit: Getty Images / Edwin Landseer
Edwin Landseer’s The Monarch of the Glen (1851) and other nostalgic paintings in reproduction form evoked idealised versions of Britain in homesick settlers from Hong Kong to Tasmania. Credit: Getty Images / Edwin Landseer
Jason Wordie
Opinion

Opinion

Then & Now by Jason Wordie

Paintings of landmarks, portraits, nostalgic depictions of home – how art tastes developed among Asia’s early expats

  • Uniformity of aesthetic tastes among small-pond expat worlds scattered across Asia created a ready market for artists
  • Various travelling artists made a solid living through painting old residents and new arrivals, with George Chinnery among the most well known

Edwin Landseer’s The Monarch of the Glen (1851) and other nostalgic paintings in reproduction form evoked idealised versions of Britain in homesick settlers from Hong Kong to Tasmania. Credit: Getty Images / Edwin Landseer
Edwin Landseer’s The Monarch of the Glen (1851) and other nostalgic paintings in reproduction form evoked idealised versions of Britain in homesick settlers from Hong Kong to Tasmania. Credit: Getty Images / Edwin Landseer
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