A print of a scene of execution in China from the 19th century. Photo: Universal Images Group via Getty Images
A print of a scene of execution in China from the 19th century. Photo: Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Wee Kek Koon
Opinion

Opinion

Reflections by Wee Kek Koon

Like the Taliban, Chinese once publicly displayed bodies of the executed, in a form called ‘abandoned in the marketplace’

  • Examples of the ancient Chinese form of punishment suggest the victims’ bodies were left for public display as an indication of the severity of their crimes
  • One famous case involved the vice-censor-in-chief of Empress Wu Zetian, whose corpse was left in the open and mutilated by his enemies.

A print of a scene of execution in China from the 19th century. Photo: Universal Images Group via Getty Images
A print of a scene of execution in China from the 19th century. Photo: Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Corrected [12:01pm, 9 Oct, 2021]

  • [12:01pm, 9 Oct, 2021]

    This is a column about Chinese history, so any usage of "China" or "Chinese" is by nature historical. To make this clear, the word "once" has been added to headlines

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