A huge paper statue of the “Ghost King” and others burn during Hungry Ghost Festival celebrations in Tai Kong Po Tsuen, Hong Kong. Photo: Nora Tam
A huge paper statue of the “Ghost King” and others burn during Hungry Ghost Festival celebrations in Tai Kong Po Tsuen, Hong Kong. Photo: Nora Tam
Wee Kek Koon
Opinion

Opinion

Reflections by Wee Kek Koon

‘Chinese Halloween’ the Hungry Ghost Festival sticks to its roots, unlike this week’s celebrations

  • Observed in the seventh month of the traditional Chinese calendar, the Hungry Ghost Festival is celebrated in different ways among Chinese communities
  • The festival is a good example of how the Chinese, at least in historical times, were very open to foreign cultural influences

A huge paper statue of the “Ghost King” and others burn during Hungry Ghost Festival celebrations in Tai Kong Po Tsuen, Hong Kong. Photo: Nora Tam
A huge paper statue of the “Ghost King” and others burn during Hungry Ghost Festival celebrations in Tai Kong Po Tsuen, Hong Kong. Photo: Nora Tam
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