A market in Vancouver’s Chinatown. The narrator of Pik-Shuen Fung’s novel Ghost Forest grows up there, with her father staying behind in Hong Kong. His death makes her realise how little she knew about him - and about her Chinese heritage. Photo: Getty Images
A market in Vancouver’s Chinatown. The narrator of Pik-Shuen Fung’s novel Ghost Forest grows up there, with her father staying behind in Hong Kong. His death makes her realise how little she knew about him - and about her Chinese heritage. Photo: Getty Images

Review |
She grows up in Vancouver, her father stays in Hong Kong. Only when he dies does she get to know him, in Pik-Shuen Fung’s original, affecting novel Ghost Forest

  • In Pik-Shuen Fung’s Ghost Forest, an unnamed narrator grapples with adolescence in Canada and an absent father. His death spurs her to preserve his memory
  • She turns to her mother and grandmother to understand him, and her Chinese heritage. Heavy themes, then, but conveyed with an artistry that brings joy

A market in Vancouver’s Chinatown. The narrator of Pik-Shuen Fung’s novel Ghost Forest grows up there, with her father staying behind in Hong Kong. His death makes her realise how little she knew about him - and about her Chinese heritage. Photo: Getty Images
A market in Vancouver’s Chinatown. The narrator of Pik-Shuen Fung’s novel Ghost Forest grows up there, with her father staying behind in Hong Kong. His death makes her realise how little she knew about him - and about her Chinese heritage. Photo: Getty Images
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