An illustrated map depicting the journey of the Venetian merchant Marco Polo along the silk road to China. In a book about travel writing, Tim Hennigan lauds an author many now doubt existed, yet finds no room for a popular writer such as Bill Bryson. Photo: Getty Images
An illustrated map depicting the journey of the Venetian merchant Marco Polo along the silk road to China. In a book about travel writing, Tim Hennigan lauds an author many now doubt existed, yet finds no room for a popular writer such as Bill Bryson. Photo: Getty Images

Review |
There’s Marco Polo but no Bill Bryson, Colin Thubron but no Thomas Coryat – author’s critical examination of travel writing has gaps

  • Tim Hannigan sets out to ask travel writers, many male and mainly English (there’s no Bill Bryson), what travel writing is, having once wanted to be one himself
  • He pulls apart the tricks of the travel writer’s trade while employing them amply himself, yet doesn’t satisfactorily answer the question with which he began

Topic |   Books and literature
An illustrated map depicting the journey of the Venetian merchant Marco Polo along the silk road to China. In a book about travel writing, Tim Hennigan lauds an author many now doubt existed, yet finds no room for a popular writer such as Bill Bryson. Photo: Getty Images
An illustrated map depicting the journey of the Venetian merchant Marco Polo along the silk road to China. In a book about travel writing, Tim Hennigan lauds an author many now doubt existed, yet finds no room for a popular writer such as Bill Bryson. Photo: Getty Images
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