Prisoners of war at St. Stephen’s College in Hong Kong, which was used by Japanese troops as an internment camp for British soldiers during World War II. Publications of POWs’ memoirs, once widespread, dwindled as people went on with their renewed peacetime lives.
Prisoners of war at St. Stephen’s College in Hong Kong, which was used by Japanese troops as an internment camp for British soldiers during World War II. Publications of POWs’ memoirs, once widespread, dwindled as people went on with their renewed peacetime lives.
Jason Wordie
Opinion

Opinion

Then & Now by Jason Wordie

Who writes Hong Kong memoirs? Examples from World War II survivors to policemen to those who just want to settle scores can reveal history in a new light

  • Police memoirs have begun to appear in quantity from Hong Kong which, until recently, were among the most elusive
  • Some recent offerings were clearly written in response to earlier works by former superiors or contemporaries; a desire to ‘set the record straight’ is apparent

Prisoners of war at St. Stephen’s College in Hong Kong, which was used by Japanese troops as an internment camp for British soldiers during World War II. Publications of POWs’ memoirs, once widespread, dwindled as people went on with their renewed peacetime lives.
Prisoners of war at St. Stephen’s College in Hong Kong, which was used by Japanese troops as an internment camp for British soldiers during World War II. Publications of POWs’ memoirs, once widespread, dwindled as people went on with their renewed peacetime lives.
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