Chang’e, Chinese Goddess of the Moon, as depicted in a 1922 book. Novelist Sue Lynn Tan has reimagined the moon goddess myth by giving her a daughter, and another reason to drink the magical elixir at the story’s heart. Photo: Getty Images
Chang’e, Chinese Goddess of the Moon, as depicted in a 1922 book. Novelist Sue Lynn Tan has reimagined the moon goddess myth by giving her a daughter, and another reason to drink the magical elixir at the story’s heart. Photo: Getty Images

Daughter of the Moon Goddess author Sue Lynn Tan on her reimagining of a Chinese myth and reaching for a dream

  • In coming-of-age novel Daughter of the Moon Goddess, Hong Kong-based Malaysian author Sue Lynn Tan imagines the goddess Chang’e has a daughter, Silver Star
  • She draws connections between her own adolescence and Silver Star’s and says: ‘You put a piece of yourself in a novel. To have it rejected is terrifying’

Topic |   Books and literature
Chang’e, Chinese Goddess of the Moon, as depicted in a 1922 book. Novelist Sue Lynn Tan has reimagined the moon goddess myth by giving her a daughter, and another reason to drink the magical elixir at the story’s heart. Photo: Getty Images
Chang’e, Chinese Goddess of the Moon, as depicted in a 1922 book. Novelist Sue Lynn Tan has reimagined the moon goddess myth by giving her a daughter, and another reason to drink the magical elixir at the story’s heart. Photo: Getty Images
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