A hutong in Beijing. Liu Xinwu sets his 1984 novel The Wedding Party in one such alleyway community, and beneath his descriptions of mundane events and interactions swirl resentments and trauma. Photo: Getty Images
A hutong in Beijing. Liu Xinwu sets his 1984 novel The Wedding Party in one such alleyway community, and beneath his descriptions of mundane events and interactions swirl resentments and trauma. Photo: Getty Images

Like a Dickens or Dostoevsky novel, tale of Beijing hutong life The Wedding Party, by Liu Xinwu, conceals drama and trauma beneath the seemingly inconsequential

  • In a Beijing alleyway community Auntie Xue is preparing a wedding celebration for her son. Outside the hutong, China is changing in Deng Xiaoping’s reform era
  • So begins Liu Xinwu’s newly translated 1984 novel, in which, as in tales by Dickens and Dostoevsky, jealousies and resentments swirl beneath a mundane surface

Topic |   Books and literature
A hutong in Beijing. Liu Xinwu sets his 1984 novel The Wedding Party in one such alleyway community, and beneath his descriptions of mundane events and interactions swirl resentments and trauma. Photo: Getty Images
A hutong in Beijing. Liu Xinwu sets his 1984 novel The Wedding Party in one such alleyway community, and beneath his descriptions of mundane events and interactions swirl resentments and trauma. Photo: Getty Images
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