A chicken dish at a Hong Kong private kitchen. “If a chicken has been killed and is not cooked properly, that chicken has died in vain,” writes Chinese philosopher Lin Yutang in his introduction to a classic cookbook by his wife and youngest daughter, Secrets of Chinese Cooking. Photo: SCMP/Samantha Sin
A chicken dish at a Hong Kong private kitchen. “If a chicken has been killed and is not cooked properly, that chicken has died in vain,” writes Chinese philosopher Lin Yutang in his introduction to a classic cookbook by his wife and youngest daughter, Secrets of Chinese Cooking. Photo: SCMP/Samantha Sin

Why Chinese cuisine beats French cuisine for variety and how a Chinese cook makes sure to give a chicken a worthy death

  • The essence of Chinese cooking is the blending of flavours, and the variety of combinations is practically inexhaustible, philosopher Lin Yutang writes
  • If we kill a chicken and don’t cook it properly we haven’t honoured its death, he also says in the introduction to a classic cookbook by his wife and daughter

A chicken dish at a Hong Kong private kitchen. “If a chicken has been killed and is not cooked properly, that chicken has died in vain,” writes Chinese philosopher Lin Yutang in his introduction to a classic cookbook by his wife and youngest daughter, Secrets of Chinese Cooking. Photo: SCMP/Samantha Sin
A chicken dish at a Hong Kong private kitchen. “If a chicken has been killed and is not cooked properly, that chicken has died in vain,” writes Chinese philosopher Lin Yutang in his introduction to a classic cookbook by his wife and youngest daughter, Secrets of Chinese Cooking. Photo: SCMP/Samantha Sin
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