Some wine bottles were getting thicker and heavier from the 2000s on, causing wine expert Jancis Robinson to campaign against the practice, which accounts for a large part of wine’s carbon footprint. Photo: Shutterstock
Some wine bottles were getting thicker and heavier from the 2000s on, causing wine expert Jancis Robinson to campaign against the practice, which accounts for a large part of wine’s carbon footprint. Photo: Shutterstock
Yulia Ezhikova
Opinion

Opinion

Yulia Ezhikova

Why are some wine bottles so heavy, and do we need them at all? The case against excessive wine packaging and its heavy carbon footprint

  • As drinking wine became more popular in the 2000s, some producers started using heavier bottles to distinguish their wines, increasing their carbon footprint
  • Things got so bad that wine expert Jancis Robinson began publishing lists of the worst offenders. Scientists are now seeking alternatives to bottles for wine

Some wine bottles were getting thicker and heavier from the 2000s on, causing wine expert Jancis Robinson to campaign against the practice, which accounts for a large part of wine’s carbon footprint. Photo: Shutterstock
Some wine bottles were getting thicker and heavier from the 2000s on, causing wine expert Jancis Robinson to campaign against the practice, which accounts for a large part of wine’s carbon footprint. Photo: Shutterstock
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