Nan Fung Textiles, in Tsuen Wan, circa 2011. The former textile factory will reopen later this year as arts complex, The Mills. Picture: MILL6 Foundation Nan Fung Textiles, in Tsuen Wan, circa 2011. The former textile factory will reopen later this year as arts complex, The Mills. Picture: MILL6 Foundation
Nan Fung Textiles, in Tsuen Wan, circa 2011. The former textile factory will reopen later this year as arts complex, The Mills. Picture: MILL6 Foundation
Lisa Lim
Opinion

Opinion

Language Matters by Lisa Lim

From Canton’s Thirteen Factories to Hong Kong cotton mills: where the word ‘factory’ comes from

Despite Latin origins, the English word can be traced to a 1582 translation of a Portuguese historian’s account of India

Nan Fung Textiles, in Tsuen Wan, circa 2011. The former textile factory will reopen later this year as arts complex, The Mills. Picture: MILL6 Foundation Nan Fung Textiles, in Tsuen Wan, circa 2011. The former textile factory will reopen later this year as arts complex, The Mills. Picture: MILL6 Foundation
Nan Fung Textiles, in Tsuen Wan, circa 2011. The former textile factory will reopen later this year as arts complex, The Mills. Picture: MILL6 Foundation
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Lisa Lim

Lisa Lim

Lisa Lim has worked in Singapore, Britain, Amsterdam and Sri Lanka, and until June 2018 was Associate Professor and Head of the School of English at the University of Hong Kong, where she still holds an Honorary position. She now is Associate Professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Sydney. She is co-editor of the journal Language Ecology, founder of the website linguisticminorities.hk, and co-author of Languages in Contact (Cambridge University Press, 2016).