World No 1 ranked female tennis player, Japan's Naomi Osaka, with her Haitian father Leonard Francois, after her victory in the women's singles final at the Australian Open. Picture: AFP World No 1 ranked female tennis player, Japan's Naomi Osaka, with her Haitian father Leonard Francois, after her victory in the women's singles final at the Australian Open. Picture: AFP
World No 1 ranked female tennis player, Japan's Naomi Osaka, with her Haitian father Leonard Francois, after her victory in the women's singles final at the Australian Open. Picture: AFP
Wee Kek Koon
Opinion

Opinion

Reflections by Wee Kek Koon

Why ignore Naomi Osaka’s Haitian heritage? Identity has long been a product of mixed marriages, just look at China

In imperial China, the Han Chinese assimilated with rulers and subjects through intermarriage, a history that is largely ignored by labels that overlook the complexities of what came before

World No 1 ranked female tennis player, Japan's Naomi Osaka, with her Haitian father Leonard Francois, after her victory in the women's singles final at the Australian Open. Picture: AFP World No 1 ranked female tennis player, Japan's Naomi Osaka, with her Haitian father Leonard Francois, after her victory in the women's singles final at the Australian Open. Picture: AFP
World No 1 ranked female tennis player, Japan's Naomi Osaka, with her Haitian father Leonard Francois, after her victory in the women's singles final at the Australian Open. Picture: AFP
READ FULL ARTICLE
Wee Kek Koon

Wee Kek Koon

Having lived his whole life in the modern cities of Singapore and Hong Kong, Wee Kek Koon has an inexplicable fascination with the past. He is constantly amazed by how much he can mine from China's history for his weekly column in Post Magazine, which he has written since 2005.