Doxxing – when a person’s private information is leaked online – has become prevalent during the ongoing Hong Kong protests. Illustration: Mario Riviera
Lisa Lim
Opinion

Opinion

Language Matters by Lisa Lim

Doxxing: the powerful ‘weapon’ in the Hong Kong protests had a petty beginning

  • ‘Dropping dox’, as it was known in the 1990s, was an act of retribution during flame wars in which hackers and posters got into arguments online
  • It refers to the act of leaking an individual’s personal information for the purpose of humiliation or intimidation

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Doxxing – when a person’s private information is leaked online – has become prevalent during the ongoing Hong Kong protests. Illustration: Mario Riviera
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Lisa Lim

Lisa Lim

Lisa Lim has worked in Singapore, Britain, Amsterdam and Sri Lanka, and until June 2018 was Associate Professor and Head of the School of English at the University of Hong Kong, where she still holds an Honorary position. She now is Associate Professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Sydney. She is co-editor of the journal Language Ecology, founder of the website linguisticminorities.hk, and co-author of Languages in Contact (Cambridge University Press, 2016).