A late-19th century Chinese-style painting in the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, Photo: Getty Images A late-19th century Chinese-style painting in the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, Photo: Getty Images
A late-19th century Chinese-style painting in the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, Photo: Getty Images
Wee Kek Koon
Opinion

Opinion

Reflections by Wee Kek Koon

In Chinese history, names were changed to remove racist overtones

  • Successive waves of ‘barbarian’ invaders largely purged Chinese language and writings of racist references
  • Ancient Chinese associated the cardinal points with neighbouring peoples and the words took on negative connotations

A late-19th century Chinese-style painting in the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, Photo: Getty Images A late-19th century Chinese-style painting in the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, Photo: Getty Images
A late-19th century Chinese-style painting in the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, Photo: Getty Images
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Wee Kek Koon

Wee Kek Koon

Having lived his whole life in the modern cities of Singapore and Hong Kong, Wee Kek Koon has an inexplicable fascination with the past. He is constantly amazed by how much he can mine from China's history for his weekly column in Post Magazine, which he has written since 2005.