Donald Moore and his wife, Joanna, helped build an arts and culture scene in Singapore and Malaya after the second World War II. Photo: courtesy of Sumi SaitoDonald Moore and his wife, Joanna, helped build an arts and culture scene in Singapore and Malaya after the second World War II. Photo: courtesy of Sumi Saito
Donald Moore and his wife, Joanna, helped build an arts and culture scene in Singapore and Malaya after the second World War II. Photo: courtesy of Sumi Saito
Jason Wordie
Opinion

Opinion

Then & Now by Jason Wordie

Singapore once embraced Europeans, until a campaign made writers like Donald Moore leave

  • Despite enriching the post-war cultural life of Singapore, a shift towards a more Asian identity changed the Lion City’s artistic appetite
  • Donald Moore’s writings document visits to 1950s Hong Kong, and contain vivid records of times of rapid change

Donald Moore and his wife, Joanna, helped build an arts and culture scene in Singapore and Malaya after the second World War II. Photo: courtesy of Sumi SaitoDonald Moore and his wife, Joanna, helped build an arts and culture scene in Singapore and Malaya after the second World War II. Photo: courtesy of Sumi Saito
Donald Moore and his wife, Joanna, helped build an arts and culture scene in Singapore and Malaya after the second World War II. Photo: courtesy of Sumi Saito
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