An image from a march during National Sorry Day 2007, which marked 10 years since the release of the Australia’s “Bringing Them Home” report. Photo: Fairfax Media via Getty Images
An image from a march during National Sorry Day 2007, which marked 10 years since the release of the Australia’s “Bringing Them Home” report. Photo: Fairfax Media via Getty Images
Lisa Lim
Opinion

Opinion

Language Matters by Lisa Lim

National Sorry Day: the origins of the word ‘sorry’ and how the meaning of apologies has changed over time

  • Held yearly on May 26, Australia’s National Sorry Day acknowledges the loss suffered by ‘the stolen generations’ of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Originating in Old English as penitential acts and confessions to God, the word ‘sorry’ is now often used as mere token acknowledgement of minor offences

An image from a march during National Sorry Day 2007, which marked 10 years since the release of the Australia’s “Bringing Them Home” report. Photo: Fairfax Media via Getty Images
An image from a march during National Sorry Day 2007, which marked 10 years since the release of the Australia’s “Bringing Them Home” report. Photo: Fairfax Media via Getty Images
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