A Taiwan flag flies in Hong Kong on the Double Tenth holiday in 2011 at the Red House in Castle Peak, Tuen Mun, marking the centenary of the Wuchang uprising that led to the Republic of China. The holiday was formerly celebrated in other places in the territory, including Rennie’s Mill and Kam Tin. Photo: SCMP/K.Y. Cheng
A Taiwan flag flies in Hong Kong on the Double Tenth holiday in 2011 at the Red House in Castle Peak, Tuen Mun, marking the centenary of the Wuchang uprising that led to the Republic of China. The holiday was formerly celebrated in other places in the territory, including Rennie’s Mill and Kam Tin. Photo: SCMP/K.Y. Cheng
Jason Wordie
Opinion

Opinion

Then & Now by Jason Wordie

When Nationalist flags bedecked a Hong Kong town for Double Tenth holiday in live-and-let-live era that seems long gone

  • Commemoration of the Wuchang uprising in 1911 that led to the Republic of China’s formation was a lively affair in parts of Hong Kong under ‘Pax Britannica’
  • In Kam Tin in the New Territories Nationalist flags lined the road, fireworks flashed all night and the drinking went on until dawn

A Taiwan flag flies in Hong Kong on the Double Tenth holiday in 2011 at the Red House in Castle Peak, Tuen Mun, marking the centenary of the Wuchang uprising that led to the Republic of China. The holiday was formerly celebrated in other places in the territory, including Rennie’s Mill and Kam Tin. Photo: SCMP/K.Y. Cheng
A Taiwan flag flies in Hong Kong on the Double Tenth holiday in 2011 at the Red House in Castle Peak, Tuen Mun, marking the centenary of the Wuchang uprising that led to the Republic of China. The holiday was formerly celebrated in other places in the territory, including Rennie’s Mill and Kam Tin. Photo: SCMP/K.Y. Cheng
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