Thousands of Chinese eggs on the quayside in Shanghai, where in a factory they were cracked into four-gallon tins for export to England. At the time Chinese regarded eggs as a useless by-product of farming chickens. Photo: Getty Images
Thousands of Chinese eggs on the quayside in Shanghai, where in a factory they were cracked into four-gallon tins for export to England. At the time Chinese regarded eggs as a useless by-product of farming chickens. Photo: Getty Images
Jason Wordie
Opinion

Opinion

Then & Now by Jason Wordie

When Chinese didn’t value eggs, a foreigner saw opportunity and launched a roaring trade from Shanghai in tinned eggs to the UK

  • There was a time when Chinese people considered eggs a useless by-product of raising chickens. A trade in canned Chinese eggs for export sprang up in the 1920s
  • After 1949 and with a UN trade embargo on China, preserved eggs from certified Free World poultry in Hong Kong were sold in the Chinatowns of North America

Thousands of Chinese eggs on the quayside in Shanghai, where in a factory they were cracked into four-gallon tins for export to England. At the time Chinese regarded eggs as a useless by-product of farming chickens. Photo: Getty Images
Thousands of Chinese eggs on the quayside in Shanghai, where in a factory they were cracked into four-gallon tins for export to England. At the time Chinese regarded eggs as a useless by-product of farming chickens. Photo: Getty Images
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