An old Hakka woman wearing a traditional fringed hat walks through the old walled village of Kam Tin in Hong Kong’s New Territories. Han Chinese whose name means “guest people”, the Hakka were refugees for centuries in their own country. Photo: AFP
An old Hakka woman wearing a traditional fringed hat walks through the old walled village of Kam Tin in Hong Kong’s New Territories. Han Chinese whose name means “guest people”, the Hakka were refugees for centuries in their own country. Photo: AFP
Wee Kek Koon
Opinion

Opinion

Reflections by Wee Kek Koon

The Hakka, Chinese refugees from war and intolerance who kept fleeing south, as far as Hong Kong, and even overseas

  • Millions of refugees around the world today live uncertain lives, driven from their homes by war, violence, persecution and other life-threatening situations
  • For centuries Hakka Chinese experienced similar uncertainty, until they put down permanent roots in southern China, including Hong Kong, and overseas

An old Hakka woman wearing a traditional fringed hat walks through the old walled village of Kam Tin in Hong Kong’s New Territories. Han Chinese whose name means “guest people”, the Hakka were refugees for centuries in their own country. Photo: AFP
An old Hakka woman wearing a traditional fringed hat walks through the old walled village of Kam Tin in Hong Kong’s New Territories. Han Chinese whose name means “guest people”, the Hakka were refugees for centuries in their own country. Photo: AFP

Corrected [11:41am, 8 Aug, 2022]

  • [11:41am, 8 Aug, 2022]

    A photo caption wrongly said Hakka were among women migrants to Singapore from Guangdong known as Samsui. The Samsui were Cantonese speakers, not Hakka women. The photo has been removed.

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