Painter Alfonso Barretto at his easel with two of his sisters, Mrs Tilly D’Almada e Castro (left) and Mrs Olive Basto, at  Girassol, the house he built with his wife, Gloria, in Tai Po Kau, in Hong Kong’s New Territories. Photo:  courtesy of D’Almada Barretto Collection
Painter Alfonso Barretto at his easel with two of his sisters, Mrs Tilly D’Almada e Castro (left) and Mrs Olive Basto, at Girassol, the house he built with his wife, Gloria, in Tai Po Kau, in Hong Kong’s New Territories. Photo: courtesy of D’Almada Barretto Collection
Jason Wordie
Opinion

Opinion

Then & Now by Jason Wordie

Portuguese artist in Hong Kong Alfonso Barretto, who honed his craft as a prisoner of war, is overdue a major retrospective

  • Alfonso Barretto owed his successful post-1945 painting career to drawing classes in a Hong Kong prisoner-of-war camp, where he sketched Japanese guards
  • Born into a prominent Hong Kong Portuguese family, he knew, and painted, everyone from New Territories farmers to public figures until his death aged 50

Painter Alfonso Barretto at his easel with two of his sisters, Mrs Tilly D’Almada e Castro (left) and Mrs Olive Basto, at  Girassol, the house he built with his wife, Gloria, in Tai Po Kau, in Hong Kong’s New Territories. Photo:  courtesy of D’Almada Barretto Collection
Painter Alfonso Barretto at his easel with two of his sisters, Mrs Tilly D’Almada e Castro (left) and Mrs Olive Basto, at Girassol, the house he built with his wife, Gloria, in Tai Po Kau, in Hong Kong’s New Territories. Photo: courtesy of D’Almada Barretto Collection
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