The Potala Palace in the city of Lhasa in the Tibet Autonomous region of China. Since 1996, concerns have been expressed about the destruction of historic buildings around the palace, and irreversible changes to the area’s historic character. Photo: Getty Images The Potala Palace in the city of Lhasa in the Tibet Autonomous region of China. Since 1996, concerns have been expressed about the destruction of historic buildings around the palace, and irreversible changes to the area’s historic character. Photo: Getty Images
The Potala Palace in the city of Lhasa in the Tibet Autonomous region of China. Since 1996, concerns have been expressed about the destruction of historic buildings around the palace, and irreversible changes to the area’s historic character. Photo: Getty Images
Tourism

Why Unesco can do little to prevent World Heritage sites being destroyed – nowhere is that shown better than in China

  • The World Heritage Committee is mostly just a paper tiger when it comes to enforcement of its rules, with some member states doing just as they please
  • In 2019, the committee ‘regretted’ China’s construction of a new railway line and station at Badaling, a Great Wall site, without any consultation

Topic |   Tourism
The Potala Palace in the city of Lhasa in the Tibet Autonomous region of China. Since 1996, concerns have been expressed about the destruction of historic buildings around the palace, and irreversible changes to the area’s historic character. Photo: Getty Images The Potala Palace in the city of Lhasa in the Tibet Autonomous region of China. Since 1996, concerns have been expressed about the destruction of historic buildings around the palace, and irreversible changes to the area’s historic character. Photo: Getty Images
The Potala Palace in the city of Lhasa in the Tibet Autonomous region of China. Since 1996, concerns have been expressed about the destruction of historic buildings around the palace, and irreversible changes to the area’s historic character. Photo: Getty Images
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