Wildlife populations are growing in Malawi’s Liwonde National Park, after management started engaging with local human communities. Above: locals sell honey at the park. Photo: Daniel Allen
Wildlife populations are growing in Malawi’s Liwonde National Park, after management started engaging with local human communities. Above: locals sell honey at the park. Photo: Daniel Allen
Tourism

National park in Malawi, southern Africa, sets benchmark for reducing human-animal conflict and restoring habitat for wildlife, and safari tourism grows

  • Lions, elephants and other wildlife are thriving in Liwonde National Park, seven years after international managers were hired to engage with local villagers
  • Safari tourism, key to making the park self-sustaining, is up and poaching and illegal fishing are down, but the battle to safeguard wildlife is constant

Wildlife populations are growing in Malawi’s Liwonde National Park, after management started engaging with local human communities. Above: locals sell honey at the park. Photo: Daniel Allen
Wildlife populations are growing in Malawi’s Liwonde National Park, after management started engaging with local human communities. Above: locals sell honey at the park. Photo: Daniel Allen
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