The ikejime method plays a key role in keeping sushi tasting fresh, but it’s not always pretty to observe, as demonstrated here by Andrew Tsui, president of the US-based Ike Jime Federation. Photos: Handout
The ikejime method plays a key role in keeping sushi tasting fresh, but it’s not always pretty to observe, as demonstrated here by Andrew Tsui, president of the US-based Ike Jime Federation. Photos: Handout

Explainer |
What is ikejime and is it a humane way of preparing sushi? The traditional Japanese method of ‘closing the fish’ ensures a stress-free death, but campaigners say it’s unnecessarily cruel

  • You might think the sushi on your plate is fresh – but meticulous traditional ageing techniques often mean this couldn’t be the further from the truth
  • Stressed fish don’t make for satisfying sashimi, which is why the Japanese developed ikejime to ensure a sudden death – but detractors argue it’s not the only, or most ethical, approach

The ikejime method plays a key role in keeping sushi tasting fresh, but it’s not always pretty to observe, as demonstrated here by Andrew Tsui, president of the US-based Ike Jime Federation. Photos: Handout
The ikejime method plays a key role in keeping sushi tasting fresh, but it’s not always pretty to observe, as demonstrated here by Andrew Tsui, president of the US-based Ike Jime Federation. Photos: Handout
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