New 3D-printing techniques on skin use computer vision to track and adjust to movements in real-time. Photo: McAlpine group, University of Minnesota

3D printers already create human tissue, a house and smart ‘skin devices’, so what will future bring?

Breakthroughs see technology used to make body parts such as corneas, a home in 52 hours, lightweight cars and electronic devices worn on the skin

Topic |   Premier Living

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New 3D-printing techniques on skin use computer vision to track and adjust to movements in real-time. Photo: McAlpine group, University of Minnesota
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Peta Tomlinson

Peta Tomlinson

Peta Tomlinson is an Asia-focused journalist who has lived and worked in Australia and Hong Kong. Making the most of her global mobile office, she contributes to South China Morning Post on topics including design, property, lifestyle and special reports.