Changes in ocean temperatures stress healthy corals, causing them to expel algae living in their tissues which drains them of their vibrant colours in a process known as bleaching. Photo: Handout Changes in ocean temperatures stress healthy corals, causing them to expel algae living in their tissues which drains them of their vibrant colours in a process known as bleaching. Photo: Handout
Changes in ocean temperatures stress healthy corals, causing them to expel algae living in their tissues which drains them of their vibrant colours in a process known as bleaching. Photo: Handout

Australia’s Great Barrier Reef has lost half its corals in past 25 years due to climate change

  • Scientists expect the corals to continue dying off unless Paris Agreement commitments to stem the increase in global temperatures are kept
  • The reef, worth US$4 billion a year in tourism revenue for Australia before the coronavirus pandemic, is in danger of losing its World Heritage status

Topic |   Australia
Changes in ocean temperatures stress healthy corals, causing them to expel algae living in their tissues which drains them of their vibrant colours in a process known as bleaching. Photo: Handout Changes in ocean temperatures stress healthy corals, causing them to expel algae living in their tissues which drains them of their vibrant colours in a process known as bleaching. Photo: Handout
Changes in ocean temperatures stress healthy corals, causing them to expel algae living in their tissues which drains them of their vibrant colours in a process known as bleaching. Photo: Handout
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