Students are seen at a mortuary learning about how to move a body. With more than 130,000 girls and women dying each year, requests for female funeral directors are expected to rise. Photo: Reuters Students are seen at a mortuary learning about how to move a body. With more than 130,000 girls and women dying each year, requests for female funeral directors are expected to rise. Photo: Reuters
Students are seen at a mortuary learning about how to move a body. With more than 130,000 girls and women dying each year, requests for female funeral directors are expected to rise. Photo: Reuters

In South Korea, more women becoming undertakers as taboo around death fades

  • The trend comes amid growing sexual violence, deaths of female celebrities such as K-pop stars, and requests for more women funeral directors
  • About 60 per cent of mortician students are now female, despite this being considered taboo in the past

Topic |   South Korea
Students are seen at a mortuary learning about how to move a body. With more than 130,000 girls and women dying each year, requests for female funeral directors are expected to rise. Photo: Reuters Students are seen at a mortuary learning about how to move a body. With more than 130,000 girls and women dying each year, requests for female funeral directors are expected to rise. Photo: Reuters
Students are seen at a mortuary learning about how to move a body. With more than 130,000 girls and women dying each year, requests for female funeral directors are expected to rise. Photo: Reuters
READ FULL ARTICLE