A Nepalese sherpa collects garbage left by climbers at an altitude of 8,000 metres during a Mount Everest clean-up expedition. A local group plans to create art out of some of the waste left at the world’s highest peak. Photo: AFP A Nepalese sherpa collects garbage left by climbers at an altitude of 8,000 metres during a Mount Everest clean-up expedition. A local group plans to create art out of some of the waste left at the world’s highest peak. Photo: AFP
A Nepalese sherpa collects garbage left by climbers at an altitude of 8,000 metres during a Mount Everest clean-up expedition. A local group plans to create art out of some of the waste left at the world’s highest peak. Photo: AFP
Nepal

Nepal to transform Mount Everest trash into art to raise environmental awareness

  • Mount Everest has been described as the world’s highest garbage dump, with climbers discarding oxygen bottles, ropes and other waste
  • The Sagarmatha Next Centre aims to upcycle this into art to generate income for locals and change perceptions about garbage and how to manage it

Topic |   Nepal
A Nepalese sherpa collects garbage left by climbers at an altitude of 8,000 metres during a Mount Everest clean-up expedition. A local group plans to create art out of some of the waste left at the world’s highest peak. Photo: AFP A Nepalese sherpa collects garbage left by climbers at an altitude of 8,000 metres during a Mount Everest clean-up expedition. A local group plans to create art out of some of the waste left at the world’s highest peak. Photo: AFP
A Nepalese sherpa collects garbage left by climbers at an altitude of 8,000 metres during a Mount Everest clean-up expedition. A local group plans to create art out of some of the waste left at the world’s highest peak. Photo: AFP
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