South Korean President Moon Jae-in (right) and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, during their historic meeting at the border village of Panmunjom. Photo: Kyodo South Korean President Moon Jae-in (right) and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, during their historic meeting at the border village of Panmunjom. Photo: Kyodo
South Korean President Moon Jae-in (right) and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, during their historic meeting at the border village of Panmunjom. Photo: Kyodo
Ankit Panda
Opinion

Opinion

Ankit Panda

How a ‘familiar’ summit put new life into the Korean peninsula’s hopes for peace 

Ankit Panda writes that the primary value of the Panmunjom declaration was Seoul and Pyongyang’s joint agreement on a vision of inter-Korean peace

South Korean President Moon Jae-in (right) and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, during their historic meeting at the border village of Panmunjom. Photo: Kyodo South Korean President Moon Jae-in (right) and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, during their historic meeting at the border village of Panmunjom. Photo: Kyodo
South Korean President Moon Jae-in (right) and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, during their historic meeting at the border village of Panmunjom. Photo: Kyodo
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Ankit Panda

Ankit Panda

Ankit Panda is an Adjunct Senior Fellow in the Defense Posture Project at the Federation of American Scientists, a Senior Editor at The Diplomat, an online magazine on Asia-Pacific affairs, and a Contributing Editor at War on the Rocks. Panda is an award-winning writer and a frequently cited analyst on geopolitical and security issues in the Asia-Pacific. His writing has appeared in The Diplomat, The Atlantic, The Daily Beast, Politico Magazine, and War on the Rocks, among other publications.