Indonesian President Joko Widodo (centre) inspects troops on a navy ship at Selat Lampa Port in the Natuna Islands on January 8. Photo: APIndonesian President Joko Widodo (centre) inspects troops on a navy ship at Selat Lampa Port in the Natuna Islands on January 8. Photo: AP
Indonesian President Joko Widodo (centre) inspects troops on a navy ship at Selat Lampa Port in the Natuna Islands on January 8. Photo: AP

Why fishing boats are on the territorial front lines of the South China Sea

  • A stand-off between China and Indonesia near the Natuna Islands highlights the growing role civilian fishing fleets play in national claims
  • The deployments are dimming hopes for a code of conduct in the troubled waters, observers say
Topic |   South China Sea
Indonesian President Joko Widodo (centre) inspects troops on a navy ship at Selat Lampa Port in the Natuna Islands on January 8. Photo: APIndonesian President Joko Widodo (centre) inspects troops on a navy ship at Selat Lampa Port in the Natuna Islands on January 8. Photo: AP
Indonesian President Joko Widodo (centre) inspects troops on a navy ship at Selat Lampa Port in the Natuna Islands on January 8. Photo: AP
READ FULL ARTICLE