A railway station in Shenyang, northeastern China, is decorated for the Lunar New Year but the usual crowds of travellers returning home for the festival are absent. Photo: Xinhua A railway station in Shenyang, northeastern China, is decorated for the Lunar New Year but the usual crowds of travellers returning home for the festival are absent. Photo: Xinhua
A railway station in Shenyang, northeastern China, is decorated for the Lunar New Year but the usual crowds of travellers returning home for the festival are absent. Photo: Xinhua

China’s stay-at-home Lunar New Year a welcome break from tradition for many

  • Not everyone is sorry to be skipping the family festivities, which usually include intrusive questions from relatives
  • Most city workers appear to be heeding the government’s call not to travel this year, in bid to prevent another Covid-19 outbreak

Topic |   Coronavirus pandemic
A railway station in Shenyang, northeastern China, is decorated for the Lunar New Year but the usual crowds of travellers returning home for the festival are absent. Photo: Xinhua A railway station in Shenyang, northeastern China, is decorated for the Lunar New Year but the usual crowds of travellers returning home for the festival are absent. Photo: Xinhua
A railway station in Shenyang, northeastern China, is decorated for the Lunar New Year but the usual crowds of travellers returning home for the festival are absent. Photo: Xinhua
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