The spillover of viruses from animals to humans is a direct result of our actions involving wildlife and their habitat, according to the lead author of a new study. Photo: AFPThe spillover of viruses from animals to humans is a direct result of our actions involving wildlife and their habitat, according to the lead author of a new study. Photo: AFP
The spillover of viruses from animals to humans is a direct result of our actions involving wildlife and their habitat, according to the lead author of a new study. Photo: AFP

Human pressure on wildlife increases risk of diseases like Covid-19, study finds

  • Hunting, wildlife trade and threats to habitat key factors in viral spillover
  • Research adds to growing evidence about the role of humans in the emergence of new infections
Topic |   Coronavirus pandemic
The spillover of viruses from animals to humans is a direct result of our actions involving wildlife and their habitat, according to the lead author of a new study. Photo: AFPThe spillover of viruses from animals to humans is a direct result of our actions involving wildlife and their habitat, according to the lead author of a new study. Photo: AFP
The spillover of viruses from animals to humans is a direct result of our actions involving wildlife and their habitat, according to the lead author of a new study. Photo: AFP
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