A scanning electron microscope image shows the coronavirus as round gold objects emerging from the surface of cells. Much is still unknown about how the virus affects children. Photo: National Institutes of Health/AFPA scanning electron microscope image shows the coronavirus as round gold objects emerging from the surface of cells. Much is still unknown about how the virus affects children. Photo: National Institutes of Health/AFP
A scanning electron microscope image shows the coronavirus as round gold objects emerging from the surface of cells. Much is still unknown about how the virus affects children. Photo: National Institutes of Health/AFP

Study on infant in Brazil suggests coronavirus ‘does not efficiently spread into brain’

  • Researchers found a concentration of the virus in just a small part of one-year-old’s brain, indicating it may have limited ability to reproduce there
  • But it could still cause infection and trigger an immune response that would damage tissue, according to non-peer-reviewed paper

Topic |   Coronavirus China
A scanning electron microscope image shows the coronavirus as round gold objects emerging from the surface of cells. Much is still unknown about how the virus affects children. Photo: National Institutes of Health/AFPA scanning electron microscope image shows the coronavirus as round gold objects emerging from the surface of cells. Much is still unknown about how the virus affects children. Photo: National Institutes of Health/AFP
A scanning electron microscope image shows the coronavirus as round gold objects emerging from the surface of cells. Much is still unknown about how the virus affects children. Photo: National Institutes of Health/AFP
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