Origami and commercial masks were tested on a mannequin in a chamber filled with tracing particles. Photo: James Smith/University of California, Irvine Origami and commercial masks were tested on a mannequin in a chamber filled with tracing particles. Photo: James Smith/University of California, Irvine
Origami and commercial masks were tested on a mannequin in a chamber filled with tracing particles. Photo: James Smith/University of California, Irvine

Coronavirus: home-made origami face masks may fit better than commercial ones, study suggests

  • US scientists say the paper-folding technique can be used to make a simple mask that potentially has a better seal than surgical or N95 masks
  • Their study, which has not been peer-reviewed, tested the filtering capacity of common materials ranging from kitchen wipes to reusable shopping bags

Topic |   Coronavirus China
Origami and commercial masks were tested on a mannequin in a chamber filled with tracing particles. Photo: James Smith/University of California, Irvine Origami and commercial masks were tested on a mannequin in a chamber filled with tracing particles. Photo: James Smith/University of California, Irvine
Origami and commercial masks were tested on a mannequin in a chamber filled with tracing particles. Photo: James Smith/University of California, Irvine
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