At work inside the Unicef warehouse, the world’s largest for humanitarian aid, in Copenhagen last week. Unicef began laying the groundwork for the Covax programme months ago. Photo: AP At work inside the Unicef warehouse, the world’s largest for humanitarian aid, in Copenhagen last week. Unicef began laying the groundwork for the Covax programme months ago. Photo: AP
At work inside the Unicef warehouse, the world’s largest for humanitarian aid, in Copenhagen last week. Unicef began laying the groundwork for the Covax programme months ago. Photo: AP

Coronavirus: it will be the biggest, fastest vaccine distribution plan ever – but can it work?

  • The stakes are high for Covax, which not only aims to stop the pandemic but at the same time treat nations, rich and poor, fairly and equitably
  • The programme is about US$200 million short of its US$2 billion 2020 target in finance for poorer countries

Topic |   Coronavirus pandemic
At work inside the Unicef warehouse, the world’s largest for humanitarian aid, in Copenhagen last week. Unicef began laying the groundwork for the Covax programme months ago. Photo: AP At work inside the Unicef warehouse, the world’s largest for humanitarian aid, in Copenhagen last week. Unicef began laying the groundwork for the Covax programme months ago. Photo: AP
At work inside the Unicef warehouse, the world’s largest for humanitarian aid, in Copenhagen last week. Unicef began laying the groundwork for the Covax programme months ago. Photo: AP
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