The Muon g-2 ring sits in its detector hall amids electronics racks, the muon beamline, and other equipment. The experiment studies the precession (or wobble) of muons as they travel through the magnetic field. Photo: Fermilab The Muon g-2 ring sits in its detector hall amids electronics racks, the muon beamline, and other equipment. The experiment studies the precession (or wobble) of muons as they travel through the magnetic field. Photo: Fermilab
The Muon g-2 ring sits in its detector hall amids electronics racks, the muon beamline, and other equipment. The experiment studies the precession (or wobble) of muons as they travel through the magnetic field. Photo: Fermilab
China science

Chinese physicist hunts for a ghost particle, undeterred by US-China friction

  • Li Liang has worked for nearly a decade on the Muon g-2 experiment involving 200 researchers from seven countries at Fermilab in the US
  • Teams in China are working on the blueprint for a muon collider with sites in Guangdong province among candidates to host the potential project

Topic |   China science
The Muon g-2 ring sits in its detector hall amids electronics racks, the muon beamline, and other equipment. The experiment studies the precession (or wobble) of muons as they travel through the magnetic field. Photo: Fermilab The Muon g-2 ring sits in its detector hall amids electronics racks, the muon beamline, and other equipment. The experiment studies the precession (or wobble) of muons as they travel through the magnetic field. Photo: Fermilab
The Muon g-2 ring sits in its detector hall amids electronics racks, the muon beamline, and other equipment. The experiment studies the precession (or wobble) of muons as they travel through the magnetic field. Photo: Fermilab
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