Ni Xijun (left), Christopher Stringer (centre), Ji Qiang worked together on papers analysing the Harbin skull. Photo: Handout Ni Xijun (left), Christopher Stringer (centre), Ji Qiang worked together on papers analysing the Harbin skull. Photo: Handout
Ni Xijun (left), Christopher Stringer (centre), Ji Qiang worked together on papers analysing the Harbin skull. Photo: Handout

When scientists came face to face with China’s Dragon Man fossil for the first time

  • Ni Xijun says he knew something was different as soon as he held the skull in his hands
  • But another important aspect of their work has been buried by controversy, he says

Topic |   Archaeology and paleontology
Ni Xijun (left), Christopher Stringer (centre), Ji Qiang worked together on papers analysing the Harbin skull. Photo: Handout Ni Xijun (left), Christopher Stringer (centre), Ji Qiang worked together on papers analysing the Harbin skull. Photo: Handout
Ni Xijun (left), Christopher Stringer (centre), Ji Qiang worked together on papers analysing the Harbin skull. Photo: Handout
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