The study tracked people who received the AstraZeneca or Sinovac vaccines in Brazil to see how effective they were at preventing infection, hospitalisation, intensive care and death. Photo: AP The study tracked people who received the AstraZeneca or Sinovac vaccines in Brazil to see how effective they were at preventing infection, hospitalisation, intensive care and death. Photo: AP
The study tracked people who received the AstraZeneca or Sinovac vaccines in Brazil to see how effective they were at preventing infection, hospitalisation, intensive care and death. Photo: AP

Coronavirus: Brazil study finds Sinovac far less effective at reducing deaths in elderly

  • AstraZeneca was found to be better at preventing infections, with a 70 per cent lower risk compared to 54 per cent for Sinovac
  • Research tracked nearly 61 million people who have received one of the two vaccines, but it has not been peer-reviewed

Topic |   Coronavirus pandemic
The study tracked people who received the AstraZeneca or Sinovac vaccines in Brazil to see how effective they were at preventing infection, hospitalisation, intensive care and death. Photo: AP The study tracked people who received the AstraZeneca or Sinovac vaccines in Brazil to see how effective they were at preventing infection, hospitalisation, intensive care and death. Photo: AP
The study tracked people who received the AstraZeneca or Sinovac vaccines in Brazil to see how effective they were at preventing infection, hospitalisation, intensive care and death. Photo: AP
READ FULL ARTICLE