The device uses electrolysis to split captured water into oxygen and hydrogen. Image: Shutterstock
The device uses electrolysis to split captured water into oxygen and hydrogen. Image: Shutterstock
Science

Scientists say their device can pull water from the air to create green hydrogen

  • The device can be used in an arid environment where relative humidity is as low as 4 per cent – meaning liquid water isn’t needed, according to international team
  • It uses porous materials soaked in electrolytes to absorb moisture then splits the water into hydrogen and oxygen, and it can be powered by excess renewable energy

The device uses electrolysis to split captured water into oxygen and hydrogen. Image: Shutterstock
The device uses electrolysis to split captured water into oxygen and hydrogen. Image: Shutterstock
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