Chinese scientists whose study of the axolotl’s ability to regenerate cells after injury was published in Science journal say their findings have the potential to help improve the regenerative capability of mammalian and human brains in the future. Photo: BGI
Chinese scientists whose study of the axolotl’s ability to regenerate cells after injury was published in Science journal say their findings have the potential to help improve the regenerative capability of mammalian and human brains in the future. Photo: BGI
Science

Chinese scientists find axolotl’s ability to regenerate after injury may hold key to human brain health

  • Team discovers new subtype of neural stem cell in amphibian’s damaged region after 15 days but neurons are not fully functioning until about 60 days post-injury
  • Scientist says ultimate research goal is to introduce stem cells to injured human brain tissue locally to restart any regeneration genes

Chinese scientists whose study of the axolotl’s ability to regenerate cells after injury was published in Science journal say their findings have the potential to help improve the regenerative capability of mammalian and human brains in the future. Photo: BGI
Chinese scientists whose study of the axolotl’s ability to regenerate cells after injury was published in Science journal say their findings have the potential to help improve the regenerative capability of mammalian and human brains in the future. Photo: BGI
READ FULL ARTICLE