The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) in Hefei, in eastern China’s Anhui province,  is the world’s first fully superconducting tokamak and the first of its kind to operate with a pulse length at the 1,000-second scale. Photo: Handout
The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) in Hefei, in eastern China’s Anhui province, is the world’s first fully superconducting tokamak and the first of its kind to operate with a pulse length at the 1,000-second scale. Photo: Handout
Science

Breakthrough in China’s artificial sun project could lead to more stable fusion energy: international team

  • Discovery could help future fusion experiments create a safe, clean and near-limitless energy source for humanity, researchers report
  • Europe-based fusion project ITER finds the results ‘very comforting’, says physicist

The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) in Hefei, in eastern China’s Anhui province,  is the world’s first fully superconducting tokamak and the first of its kind to operate with a pulse length at the 1,000-second scale. Photo: Handout
The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) in Hefei, in eastern China’s Anhui province, is the world’s first fully superconducting tokamak and the first of its kind to operate with a pulse length at the 1,000-second scale. Photo: Handout
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