The contest organiser claims in the video that by flipping through pages quickly, images start to appear in a reader’s mind to help them understand the content. Photo: PearVideo The contest organiser claims in the video that by flipping through pages quickly, images start to appear in a reader’s mind to help them understand the content. Photo: PearVideo
The contest organiser claims in the video that by flipping through pages quickly, images start to appear in a reader’s mind to help them understand the content. Photo: PearVideo

Speed-reading courses in China branded ‘utter nonsense’

  • Training centres claiming to teach children to read more than 100,000 words in minutes have stirred controversy after a competition video went viral
  • Several tutoring organisations confirm they are teaching the technique, which experts have dismissed as lacking any scientific basis

Topic |   China Society
The contest organiser claims in the video that by flipping through pages quickly, images start to appear in a reader’s mind to help them understand the content. Photo: PearVideo The contest organiser claims in the video that by flipping through pages quickly, images start to appear in a reader’s mind to help them understand the content. Photo: PearVideo
The contest organiser claims in the video that by flipping through pages quickly, images start to appear in a reader’s mind to help them understand the content. Photo: PearVideo
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