Smartphones running apps such as Telegram have offered protesters a way to communicate with each other that was not as prevalent under 2014’s umbrella movement. Photo: Edmond So

From Facebook and Twitter to Telegram, WhatsApp and Signal: how protest technology has evolved since Occupy Central

  • Encrypted messenger apps used by protesters to organise themselves, share intelligence and avoid police detection
  • But police arrest a Telegram group administrator on suspicion of conspiracy to commit public nuisance
Topic |   Hong Kong extradition bill

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Smartphones running apps such as Telegram have offered protesters a way to communicate with each other that was not as prevalent under 2014’s umbrella movement. Photo: Edmond So
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Karen Chiu

Karen Chiu

Karen Chiu is a multimedia producer with Abacus. She is interested in artificial intelligence, cybersecurity and the everyday experience of tech users. A graduate of Duke University and the University of Hong Kong, she spent four years writing and producing at CNN International before moving to the Post in 2018.

Linda Lew

Linda Lew

Born in China and raised in New Zealand, Linda joined the Post as a reporter in 2018. Previously, she freelanced for Chinese technology media site TechNode. She holds bachelor's degrees in arts and commerce from the University of Auckland, and has a master's in global business journalism from Tsinghua University.