Members of the Ocean Park Conservation Foundation’s Cetacean Stranding Response Team measure the carcass of an adult male finless porpoise on Tap Mun island. Photo: Ocean Park Conservation Foundation, Hong Kong Members of the Ocean Park Conservation Foundation’s Cetacean Stranding Response Team measure the carcass of an adult male finless porpoise on Tap Mun island. Photo: Ocean Park Conservation Foundation, Hong Kong
Members of the Ocean Park Conservation Foundation’s Cetacean Stranding Response Team measure the carcass of an adult male finless porpoise on Tap Mun island. Photo: Ocean Park Conservation Foundation, Hong Kong

Two porpoise carcasses found on separate Hong Kong shores, bringing number of cases this year to 15 – an alarming trend, green groups warn

  • Cause of deaths remains unclear, while inconclusive population data makes it hard for experts to analyse statistics
  • Most cases record blunt force trauma to marine mammal, indicating collisions with vessels, but lack of other related injuries lends little weight to theory

Topic |   Conservation
Members of the Ocean Park Conservation Foundation’s Cetacean Stranding Response Team measure the carcass of an adult male finless porpoise on Tap Mun island. Photo: Ocean Park Conservation Foundation, Hong Kong Members of the Ocean Park Conservation Foundation’s Cetacean Stranding Response Team measure the carcass of an adult male finless porpoise on Tap Mun island. Photo: Ocean Park Conservation Foundation, Hong Kong
Members of the Ocean Park Conservation Foundation’s Cetacean Stranding Response Team measure the carcass of an adult male finless porpoise on Tap Mun island. Photo: Ocean Park Conservation Foundation, Hong Kong
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