Activist Tam Tak-chi, who was charged with sedition this week, marches towards Beijing’s liaison office during a protest in 2017. Photo: AFPActivist Tam Tak-chi, who was charged with sedition this week, marches towards Beijing’s liaison office during a protest in 2017. Photo: AFP
Activist Tam Tak-chi, who was charged with sedition this week, marches towards Beijing’s liaison office during a protest in 2017. Photo: AFP

Explainer |
What is Hong Kong’s colonial-era sedition law, and how does it fit into landscape of national security legislation?

  • Recent arrests under the law have sparked concerns over freedom of speech, and questions as to whether colonial-era offences are still relevant
  • The legislation’s use has also raised questions about how it relates to the national security law, which deals with similar matters

Topic |   Hong Kong national security law (NSL)
Activist Tam Tak-chi, who was charged with sedition this week, marches towards Beijing’s liaison office during a protest in 2017. Photo: AFPActivist Tam Tak-chi, who was charged with sedition this week, marches towards Beijing’s liaison office during a protest in 2017. Photo: AFP
Activist Tam Tak-chi, who was charged with sedition this week, marches towards Beijing’s liaison office during a protest in 2017. Photo: AFP
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