Yang Fan, researcher at Dengsheng Conservation Area, installs an infrared camera to track the movements of pandas. Photo: Kanis Leung

More than a decade on from the Sichuan earthquake, the Chinese province’s giant panda population is holding up, with a little help from Hong Kong

  • The local giant panda is classified as vulnerable by the WWF and conservation was greatly complicated by the 2008 quake
  • The Hong Kong government helped with post-earthquake reconstruction in the Sichuan wildlife reserves, resulting in free visits for Hongkongers
Topic |   Pandas

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Yang Fan, researcher at Dengsheng Conservation Area, installs an infrared camera to track the movements of pandas. Photo: Kanis Leung
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Giant pandas Le Le and Ying Ying have failed to reproduce during their time in Ocean Park. Photo: Handout

After eight years of no babies, Hong Kong pandas Ying Ying and Le Le could be sent home to find new mates, as experts wonder if lack of sexual chemistry is to blame

  • Experts discuss idea of returning animals to Wolong National Nature Reserve
  • Female Ying Ying has already made the journey once, in 2015
Topic |   Ocean Park

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Giant pandas Le Le and Ying Ying have failed to reproduce during their time in Ocean Park. Photo: Handout
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