One-way permit holders are entitled to social welfare and public resources available to Hongkongers, triggering complaints that they are crowding public hospitals and adding to the long waiting time for public flats. Art: Adolfo Arranz

Red tape, money woes and a frosty welcome: mainland Chinese moving to Hong Kong

  • Up to 150 mainlanders per day can get the right to live and work in Hong Kong, sparking claims that they overstretch welfare services
  • But for many, moving south is no holiday
Topic |   Anti-mainland China sentiments

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One-way permit holders are entitled to social welfare and public resources available to Hongkongers, triggering complaints that they are crowding public hospitals and adding to the long waiting time for public flats. Art: Adolfo Arranz
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Phila Siu

Phila Siu

Phila Siu, also known as Bobby, has been a journalist since 2009. He has reported on human rights, security, politics, and society in Hong Kong, mainland China and Southeast Asia. He holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from Hong Kong Baptist University and a human rights law master's degree from the University of Hong Kong.